Faith of the Irish, part 1

I love it when I forget I have packages coming. This week I was surprised by an Amazon box sitting with our mail. Remembering that I was expecting books in the mail and seeing that they had arrived made my day — like it does every time. After watching more TV than is good for me because I had “run out” of books (Not really, but I sometimes need books that are like finger-food, you know — tasty, easy to chew, and addicting), I decided to finally use a Amazon gift card I was given for Christmas. I ordered: How the Irish Saved Civilization, by Thomas Cahill, Ender’s Game, by Orson Scott Card, and the entire Narnia series in Spanish. (why in Spanish, you might ask? I know… it’s a little ridiculous since I don’t actually speak the language, but I have a good reason I can explain later)

Right now I’m working on finishing How the Irish Saved Civilization, and I’m loving it. I’ve started it once twice before. It’s an amazingly interesting book, and the only reason my first tries were unsuccessful were because I kept having to return it to the library. I highly recommend it. In fact you should just buy it right away, rather than have to deal with returning it to anyone.

In the book, Cahill spends quite a lot of time talking about Saint Patrick, who, by all accounts, is a fascinating person even though there isn’t a lot known about him. What is known (mostly without question), is that he’s almost solely responsible from the conversion of the pagan Irish tribes to Christianity after being held as a slave for several years. He returned to Ireland to minister to the very people who had enslaved him. Here are some beautiful words that Cahill quotes, from what is known as Saint Patrick’s Breastplate*. Realizing the depth of the violent, pagan culture to which Patrick was ministering to, this prayer for protection is significant, as well as beautiful.

DSC00571

One of the stones found by the well Saint Patrick is thought to have baptized by. Saint Patrick’s Cathedral is built on the site of this well.

“I arise today, Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity, Through belief in the threeness, Through confession of the oneness, Of the Creator of Creation.

I arise today Through the strength of Christ’s birth with his baptism, Through the strength of his crucifixion with his burial, Through the strength of his resurrection with his ascension, Through the strength of his descent for the judgment of Doom.”

And then a few verses later…

“I arise today Through God’s strength to pilot me; God’s might to uphold me, God’s wisdom to guide me, God’s eye to look before me, God’s ear to hear me, God’s word to speak for me, God’s hand to guard me, God’s way to lie before me, God’s shield to protect me, God’s host to save me From snares of devils, From temptations of vices, From everyone who shall wish me ill, Afar and anear, Alone and in multitude.

I summon today all these powers between me and those evils, Against every cruel merciless power that may oppose my body and soul Against incantations of false prophets, Against black laws of pagandom, Against false laws of heretics, Against craft of idolatry, Against spells of witches and smiths and wizards, Against every knowledge that corrupts man’s body and soul.

Christ to shield me today Against poison, against burning, Against drowning, against wounding, So that there may come to me abundance of reward. Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me, Christ in me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me, Christ on my right, Christ on my left, Christ when I lie down, Christ when I sit down, Christ when I arise, Christ in the hear of every man who thinks of me, Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me, Christ in every eye that sees me, Christ in every ear that hears me.

I arise today Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity, Through belief in the threeness, Through confession of the oneness, Of the Creator of Creation.”

I just love the thoroughness of these last few verses — his desire for protection from sin and evil, and the desire for nearness of Christ is inspiring and helpful to me.

The prayer has several versions, and its so old it’s hard to tell which is the original. But if you’d like to hear a different version from a true Irishwoman, this is a beautiful song by Keith and Kristyn Getty. Kristyn quotes the end of the prayer in the last bit of the song. (Interesting tidbit — the violinist in this video goes to my church)

I want to show you a little more of Cahill’s work later, so look out for Part 2, coming soon!

DSC00566

Saint Patrick’s Catherdral, Dublin.
Built in the 1190s. Wow.

I just love the thoroughness of these last few verses — his desire for protection from sin and evil, and the desire for nearness of Christ is inspiring and helpful to me.

The prayer has several versions, and its so old it’s hard to tell which is the original. But if you’d like to hear a different version from a true Irishwoman, this is a beautiful song by Keith and Kristyn Getty. Kristyn quotes the end of the prayer in the last bit of the song. (Interesting tidbit — the violinist in this video goes to my church)

I want to show you a little more of Cahill’s work later. Look out for Part 2 coming soon!

*Saint Patrick’s Breastplate is thought to have been written by Patrick, and it is a widely accepted opinion, although it is not actually provable. At the very least though, Cahill says that it was inspired by him.

Advertisements

One thought on “Faith of the Irish, part 1

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s